Your Equipment Does Not Define You or Your Skills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I noticed my book cover on Amazon along with some of the related ones being promoted (and their covers) which reminded me at the same time of the many postings I’ve seen of people’s equipment. Some nice stuff and some Frankenstein monsters, but the underlying message (despite what was being said) was usually, ‘look at me’.

You know, the guy posts a shot of a whole load of expensive stuff with the caption: ‘off to do a blah-blah shoot’. Since surely nobody cares that he’s off to do a shoot, the obvious intended message is ‘look at all my cool stuff and be envious’.

Now look at the cover above.

That was very deliberately posed. Of course there was a humorous analogy with and throughout the book of the camera being a gun (so the Marlboro man hat and coat forwarded that), but note that the relatively small and unfancy camera is just dangling from the hand as if it were a 6 shooter and he’s off to shoot some vermin on the ranch that are stealing his chickens–or off to the OK Corral  to dispatch Billy the Kid for that matter.

The gun, the camera are tools, they are not the man.

They come out when it’s time to do the job and the pro doesn’t care what you think about them.

They’re taken care of, oiled and cleaned as any professional would treat his equipment, but except for a few of the narcissistic crazies, they don’t sleep with them, pose with them in the mirror or caress them fondly when no one is looking.

They’re just tools.

And look here: The gun that killed Billy the Kid didn’t even have a laser scope on it.

 

 

FCPX Free Plugins

fcpx free plugins

I found this list of free FCPX plugins on the Final Cut Pro X Editors  FB group that was put together by Roger Bolten, owner/director of Coremelt.

The link is to a new website he put together called FCPXFREE.com.

I’ve now added a tab to this blog called Editing Solutions that I will update from time to time with ‘must-have’ stuff that I find.

Testimonial-driven Corporate Videos

Too often corporate videos consist of the MD or executives and staff blagging about their own products and services. Nothing wrong with that, and when the people are sincere (and not forced to spout prepared marketing scripts or company ‘talking points’) they can be effective.

On the other hand, when you get the client of your multi-million dollar installation raving about you, you have to ask: “What will interest a potential new client more (and indeed make him or her directly contact you), a company spokesman or a satisfied customer?” And what if you landed on their site and all you found were 4 or 5 videos like this (which is how many we’ve done for Axiom)?

Anyway, I’m posting this really as another example of interviews and interview editing as covered in one of the chapters of Run ‘n Gun Videography–The Lone Shooter’s Survival Guide . The original interview was about 25 minutes from which I derived this narrative. It may not interest you as it’s rather technical, but for someone in that business, it would be of great interest because a few million bucks is not something you consider lightly.

The following video was directed and produced by Leapfrog Marketing (Alan Myers – 0116 278 7788) in association with The Video Whisperer.

Shooting Corporate Videos–Chapter 12 supplement

In the book Run ‘n Gun Videography–the Lone Shooter’s Survival Guide I went into some length to describe an atypical approach to shooting corporate videos which I’ve done successfully for several years now. In short, it’s a method of deriving the narrative content (or script) from an interview.  And it does take some knowledge of how to do an interview.

Anyway, I recently completed a 2 day shoot from which I produced 11 different videos. This company produces a diverse range of product protective covers as well as cotton bags and what was wanted was an overall video for the site’s home page or ‘about us’ page, several short narrated demonstration videos on their best selling products and a few more narrative driven ones, also on their best selling lines.

The sample I’m showing here is one of the latter.

This series is now one of my favorites, and the reason is that this guy was so likeable and sincere, even self-deprecating, which, oddly enough, is perfect for the UK audience which responds better to soft-sell than hard-sell.

Even he was very nervous about the whole being on camera thing and I really had to twist his arm. But he was so easy to talk to that he easily forgot about the camera and just continued to be his normal, likeable self. This, and several other short videos like it, was produced from only about 40 minutes of interview, and like any other narrative script derived from an interview, it was pieced together to create a seamless narrative even though it wasn’t recorded in the order you will hear it.

Now maybe this isn’t fair, but in the process of uploading his videos YouTube offered up some ‘related videos’ which are some of his competitors.

I’m including a couple samples–the first which I think is rather typical and the second which is simply a home-made video for a business. Please do not comment or do anything to criticise them. Rather just notice the differences and learn something from them. This is why I wrote the book Run ‘n Gun Videography–The Lone Shooter’s Survival Guide.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leT4TveP6Nw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wcf2oCXSc4E

Now, to be honest, despite what I wrote in the book, it isn’t always as easy as I describe.

The project previous to this one was an example. Very nice guy, but very self-conscious. Though I managed to break him out of it part of the time, I had to use interview material that was a bit more stiff in places, including the beginning. That one was a 12 minute video meant to replace his frequent need to take clients and brokers on 90 minute tours of the factory. It was a 2 hour interview, which tells you how difficult it was. Most of the time he was covered by B roll and for those moments he was in good form I’d bring him back on screen so you could see the passion and get a feel for the continuity of his talk (which was really created from 2 hours of interview to appear to be a seamless 12 minute talk). If you ever wanted to know how coal briquettes are made that video is last on this page. It’s titled and tagged so as to not come up on searches for that company, and is offered here only for education purposes in the context of this post.

 

 

Memory Cards–“If It’s Too Good To Be True…”

Counterfeit SD cards

I’ve always used SanDisk cards and never, ever had a problem in the 5 or 6 years I’ve being using digital equipment.

Also, I generally get the highest rated cards in terms of speed and bit rate for the equipment I’m using.

One is tempted when making SD card purchases to find a really good deal.

BUT, if what you find seems too good to be true, it probably isn’t true.

Here’s a story about SD card counterfeiting

As you will see, the counterfeited cards look identical. And where you’ll find these great deals is on eBay, Amazon or similar sites.

Site Update

I’ve gone through the Video Whisperer blog archives and dug up a few things I thought would be of interest to new subscribers–things which have probably been lost to antiquity in the deep dark depths of the Video Whisperer blog anyway.

They are some of the original videos I did on 3 point lighting and one which explains color temperature. You find them under the new menu ‘Lighting Solutions’.

I’ve also reorganized the menu and added the reviews of the Sony HXR NX30 and PXW X70 under the ‘Camera Equipment & Accessories’ tab.

This post is a bit of a holding pattern.

I’ve been promising a review of the Flexlight for a few days. I finished it a couple days ago but have been hounded by some upload and YouTube problems. Don’t know why. I’ve uploaded more than 180 videos without trouble, but this one has been giving me headaches.

Anyway, should sort out soon.

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